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Tuesday, March 19, 2019

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Miss Shannon Dominguez
School Nurse
Room: Nurses Office
Phone: 928-428-0477 ext. 215
Email: shannon.dominguez@solomon.k12.az.us
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Unpublished at teacher's request SCHOOL HOURS 7:45AM-1:45PM.


Welcome to 2019 !

3/20 & 3/21 Parent/Teacher Conferences School will dismiss at 12 Noon


How To Help Spread Viruses like Strep Throat
Teach your children to wash their hands often with soap and water.

Keep sick children home for at least 24 hours after they are no longer have a fever without using fever reducing drugs.

If your child is taking an antibiotic,they must be on it for 24 hours before returning to school.

do not send your child to school if they are sick.

Immunization Rules for School Entry/ Attendance Has Been Revised
To protect all children against serious vaccine preventable diseases, Arizona school immunization laws require students to receive immunizations before entry to child care and school. The law requires child care facilities and schools to enforce immunization requirements, maintain immunization records of all children enrolled, and submit reports to public health agencies. This letter is to inform you of recently approved rule changes to the Arizona Administrative Code (A.A.C.) Title 9, Chapter 6, Article 7, Required Immunizations for Child Care or School Entry. These changes became effective as of August 31, 2018.
The new requirements are listed below.
Child Care – Age 5 Requirements are as follows:
3 Hepatitis B
4 DTap (Diphtheria, Tetanus & Pertussis)
3 Polio
1 MMR (Measles, Mumps, & Rubella)
1 Varicella
3-4 Hib (Heamophilus Influenza type B- Before 15months of age) OR
1 Hib after 15 months of age
2 Doses of Hepatitis A are required for children 1-5 years in MARICOPA COUNTY ONLY, but are recommended in all other counties.

Grades K-12 Requirements are as follows:
3 Hepatitis B
4 Polio
2 MMR (Measles, Mumps, & Rubella)
1 Varicella
5 DTap (4 doses is acceptable if the last dose was given on or after 4th birthday)
1 Tdap (at 11 yr old, prior to 6th grade entry)
1 Meningococcal ( between 10-11 yrs old, prior to 6th grade entry)
1 Hib (after 15 months of age)

Welcome to the Health Center
Available during school hours. Here to help kids when sick. I administer medications when needed. Participate in physical education classes for grades Kindergarten through Fifth grade.

All children's immunizations must be up-to-date before students are permitted to attend classes.All students must present documentation of mouth,day,and year for each immunzation before they attend school.

Parents of all 6 graders, please remember your student is required to receive a Meningoccal,(TDAP) Tetanus, Diptheria & Pertussis, if 5 years has passed since their last DTAP/DTP/TD dose. This is state mandated!!!

Please remember to dress appropriately for the weather and for sometime -cool conditions here at school.Please make sure your child has the appropriate footwear and clothing.Rubber soled shoes are required for Physical Education Class.



How can I protect my child against flu?
Get a seasonal flu vaccine for yourself and your child to protect against seasonal flu viruses.

TAKE EVERYDAY STEPS TO PREVENT THE SPREAD OF ALL FLU VIRUSES. THIS INCLUDES:

* Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after use it.
* Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. If soap water are not available, alcohol-based hand cleaners are also effective.
* Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way.
Teach your child to take these actions too.
*Keep surfaces like bedside tables, surface in the bathroom, kitchen counters and toys for children clean by wiping them down with a household disinfectant according to directions on the product label.

Click here to open a new window and be redirected to the link mentioned above.

HEAT, HEAT and MORE HEAT!
Why is it still so HOT!!!!!!! Did you know that Arizona is one of the hottest places in the WORLD from May to Mid- September. Crazy to think that this is where we live. Year after year nearly, 1,500 Arizonians visit the emergency room because of heat related illnesses. Heat-related illnesses (HRI’s) can be fatal. In response to the increasing rate of heat related deaths in Arizona, especially with alarming concerns with student athletes, the Arizona Department of Health Services created the Heat Illness Prevention School Project (HIPSP). This was created to inform students and educators on recognition, prevention, and treatment strategies of HRI’s. Below are some tips on how to STAY COOL, STAY HYDRATED, and STAY INFORMED!

When it’s hot outside: Tips for preventing Heat Illness in students and athletes-

HYDRATE before, during and after physical activity: Drink 10 gulps of water every 15-20 minutes.

STAY COOL and restrain from strenuous physical activity outside during periods of extreme weather.

STAY INFORMED about weather-related health and safety updates. Checking the local weather can inform you if temperatures are considered extreme.

For more information on tips, prevention, treatment, and on the HIPSP program curriculum, please visit extremeweather@azdhs.gov

Common Signs of Heat-related Illness:
Heat Cramps: Muscle pains or spasms in arms, legs or abdomen along with heavy sweating.

Heat Exhaustion: Heavy sweating, weakness, cool, clammy and pale skin. Nausea and vomiting, Normal temperatures are possible, but headache, dizziness and muscle cramping are common.

Heat Stroke: Warning signs may include an extremely high body temperature (above 103 degrees) red, hot, and dry skin (no sweating), throbbing headache, unconsciousness, confusion, nausea, rapid and strong pulse, and altered mental state.

Remember to PLAY IT SAFE and KEEP COOL!

DO THE ELBOW COUGH
Teach kids to cough into elbow,not hands-where they're more likely to spread germs through touch.You are less likely to touch things with your elbow or shoulder,the germ won't spread.
Nurse Notes
Children who have the following symptoms should not come to school until these symptoms have been gone for 24 hours without the help of medication, or until the doctor sends a note stating the condition is not contagious and it is OK for your child to return to school.

Fever
If your child's temperature is 100 degrees or higher, keep your child at home. While at home, encourage your child to drink plenty of liquids. Your child should be fever-free for 24 hours (without medicine such as Tylenol or Motrin) before returning to school.

Mild Cough/Runny Nose
If there's no fever, and the child feels fairly good, school is fine.

Bad Cough/Cold Symptoms
Children with bad coughs need to stay home, and possibly see a doctor. It could be a severe cold or possibly bronchitis, flu, or pneumonia. But when the cough improves, and the child is feeling better, then it's back to school. Don't wait for the cough to disappear entirely -- that could take a week or longer!

Diarrhea or Vomiting
Keep your child home until the illness is over, and for 24 hours after the last episode without medicine.

Pink Eye (Conjunctivitis)
Keep the child home until a doctor has given the OK to return to school. Pink eye is highly contagious and most cases are caused by a virus, which will not respond to an antibiotic. Bacterial conjunctivitis will require an antibiotic; your doctor will be able to determine if this is the case. If antibiotics are prescribed, they must have at least 24 hours of the medicine or drops before returning to school.

Rash
Children with a skin rash should see a doctor, as this could be one of several infectious diseases. One possibility is impetigo, a bacterial skin infection that is very contagious and requires antibiotic treatment. If the rash has any drainage coming from it, the child must be seen by a doctor and may return with a doctor’s note clearing them for school.

It is great that students want to come to school, but it is very important to stop the spread of germs throughout the school.

STAY HOME WHEN YOU ARE TOO SICK TO COME TO SCHOOL. DO NOT COME IN TO BE EVALUATED BY THE NURSE. THIS CAUSES GERMS TO SPREAD TO CLASSMATES AND BUS PARTNERS. TAKE THEM TO THE DOCTOR

When is sick too sick for School?
SOLOMON ELEMENTRARY SCHOOL
When is Sick too Sick for School?

“Mom told me to come to school and if I am sick you can send me home.” “I threw up last night and this morning but mom said to come to school.” “I had a fever last night but I can’t be absent anymore.”
The school nurses at Solomon hear these stories and more every day, in fact usually by 8 AM. We then need to assess the students for measurable signs and symptoms of illness. No, we do not just take a temperature, we look in throats, ears and ask questions like, when did this start, how many times did you vomit, what did you take for your pain, did you see the doctor, why are you here in school?

Then we make decisions based on what we see, hear, sometimes smell and measure. Students are sent back to class unless we determine that they are too sick to stay in school or are contagious. We often tell parents to please keep their sick student home. Parents ask for guidelines as to what constitutes too sick for school. Sometimes they say ”I sent him to avoid an absence.” We cannot allow the office to be used to avoid an absence. If you student is ill please keep them home.
So what is too sick?

• A fever of 100 or more
• A cough that kept your student up during the night
• Vomiting or diarrhea
• A red draining eye
• Severe pain in the ear, stomach or any other pain that stops your student from doing
activities of daily living

A cold is not a good reason to miss class. You as the parent need to decide how bad the cold is, however if you chose to send you student with a cold we will support that decision and keep the student in school. This means we will assess the student and send them back to class. If we determine the cold warrants missing school we will call you.
If you student has a chronic health problem please share that information with us. For example if your student has asthma a cold may quickly become more severe and require a visit to your asthma doctor.

There are some things we do not send students home for. The first is menstrual cramps. Young ladies with cramps are offered heating pads and may take medication if the standing order form has been returned to the school nurse’s office. These forms are mailed home every year. The form must be updated yearly and on file in the nurse’s office. If your daughter has cramps so severe that she cannot attend school you should have her seen by your health care provider and provide instructions from that provider to the school nurse.
“I am tired” is not a reason to go home unless there are measurable signs of illness. Students often stay up late for various reasons and then want to go home or nap.

I hope this information helps you understand how school health services work, if you have any questions please call the office,
or school nurse Thank you
________________________________________


Reminders on How To Have a Healthy School Year
1. Start off strong with a healthy breakfast. A good breakfast provides energy and will help keep you alert and attentive in class. Highly sugared foods leave you feeling tired soon after eating.
Remember: Your school performance is directly related to what you eat!

2. Drink plenty of water. Water is the best fluid to stay hydrated without the added sugar found in some juice and soft drinks. Also, remember to drink the recommended amount of reduced-fat milk or milk alternative. Water and milk are available at school for breakfast and lunch every day.

3. Don’t forget to wash your hands often. Keep hands away from your face, mouth, and nose where germs can enter your body.

4. Boost your immune system. Get plenty of sleep, talk to your doctor about taking a multiple vitamin, and eat colorful fruits and vegetables every day. Think variety and rainbow colors!

5. Eat a nutritious and yummy lunch. Eat foods from all the food groups. Different food groups supply our bodies with energy to think, move, and grow. Our School lunches are nutritionally balanced, but on the weekends keep this in mind.

6. Cut back on sugar and salty snacks. Limit sodas, sport drinks, candy, chips, and ice cream – they add on extra calories, can harm your teeth, and leave you feeling tired and weak.

7. Enhance your brain performance. Exercise, play memory games, do crossword puzzles, and eat brain foods like berries, cold water fish, and nuts. Just say “NO” to fast food and enjoy a home cooked meal together at least four nights a week.

8. Get at least 30 minutes of exercise every day – at recess and at home. Go for a daily walk with a friend, a parent , or your pet. Exercise helps our bodies to be strong, flexible, and resilient.

9. Do your homework every day after school. It’s so important to be prepared!

10. Turn off the TV and video games at least one hour prior to bedtime. Take time to relax, take a - bath or shower, brush your teeth, and pack up for the morning – and still get good sleep!

Symptoms That Need To Be Addressed at Home
Children who have the following symptoms should not come to school until these symptoms have been gone for 24 hours without the help of medication, or until the doctor sends a note stating the condition is not contagious and it is OK for your child to return to school.

Fever
If your child's temperature is 100 degrees or higher, keep your child at home. While at home, encourage your child to drink plenty of liquids. Your child should be fever-free for 24 hours (without medicine such as Tylenol or Motrin) before returning to school.

Mild Cough/Runny Nose
If there's no fever, and the child feels fairly good, school is fine.

Bad Cough/Cold Symptoms
Children with bad coughs need to stay home, and possibly see a doctor. It could be a severe cold or possibly bronchitis, flu, or pneumonia. But when the cough improves, and the child is feeling better, then it's back to school. Don't wait for the cough to disappear entirely -- that could take a week or longer!

Diarrhea or Vomiting
Keep your child home until the illness is over, and for 24 hours after the last episode without medicine.

Pink Eye (Conjunctivitis)
Keep the child home until a doctor has given the OK to return to school. Pink eye is highly contagious and most cases are caused by a virus, which will not respond to an antibiotic. Bacterial conjunctivitis will require an antibiotic; your doctor will be able to determine if this is the case. If antibiotics are prescribed, they must have at least 24 hours of the medicine or drops before returning to school.

Rash
Children with a skin rash should see a doctor, as this could be one of several infectious diseases. One possibility is impetigo, a bacterial skin infection that is very contagious and requires antibiotic treatment. If the rash has any drainage coming from it, the child must be seen by a doctor and may return with a doctor’s note clearing them for school.

It is great that students want to come to school, but it is very important to stop the spread of germs throughout the school.

STAY HOME WHEN YOU ARE TOO SICK TO COME TO SCHOOL. DO NOT COME IN TO BE EVALUATED BY THE NURSE. THIS CAUSES GERMS TO SPREAD TO CLASSMATES AND BUS PARTNERS. TAKE THEM TO THE DOCTOR

Eye Exams Can Prevent Certain Learning Disabilities
About 25% of schoolchildren have un-diagnosed visual problems which makes it appear that they have a learning disability when they actually don't. One in four school-age children have vision problems that, if left untreated, can affect learning ability, personality and adjustment in school.

School-age children also spend a lot of time in recreational activities that require good vision. After-school team sports or playing in the backyard can be difficult if children can't see as they should.
Here are the most common warning signs of children who have eye and vision problems which will affect their ability to learn.
1. Consistently sitting too close to the TV or holding a book too close
2. Losing his place while reading or using a finger to guide his eyes when reading
3. Squinting or tilting the head to see better
4. Frequent eye rubbing
5. Sensitivity to light and/or excessive tearing
6. Will close one eye to read, watch TV or see better
7. Child will avoid reading and homework, or things at distance such as sports
8. Complaining of headaches or tired eyes
9. Avoiding using a computer, because it "hurts his eyes"
10. Receiving lower grades than usual
11. Teacher says your child is lazy and won't pay attention in class
12. Child sees a word like "the" on a page and reads the word as "what"
13. Your child does not see the punctuation at the beginning of a sentence
14. Child reverses letters, writes up or down hill on paper

It is important that every child get a thorough learning related eye and vision exam before entering school and at regular intervals thereafter.
As reading gets more demanding, your child's eyes need to be in tip top shape to make sure that he or she does not fall behind in school or get labeled as having learning disabilities which could have been prevented by the proper eye exams.

We offer eye exams here at Solomon School within the first 45 days after the first day of school. We will be holding vision screenings on September 18th, 2017 to out K-8th grade students. The screening will be conducted by the Lions Club. The school Nurse will contact the parents /guardian by letter if there may be a problem with your child's vision. If you do not want your child's screened, please contact the school as soon as possible.

Thanks!

HEAD LICE
A case of head lice has been detected in our school. Head lice infestation is very common, and it has been around since ancient times. While the exact frequency of infections is unknown, estimates range from 6-12 million cases annually. Anyone who comes in close contact with someone who already has head lice, or even their contaminated clothing and other belongings, is at risk for acquiring head lice. So it is easy to transmit head lice from one person to another. Preschool and elementary-school children (3-11 years of age) and their families are infected most often. Girls contract head lice more often than boys, and women contract more head lice than men.

What are Head Lice?

Head lice are parasitic wingless insects. They live on people's heads and feed on their blood. An adult louse is about the size of a sesame seed. The eggs, called nits, are even smaller - about the size of a knot in thread. Lice and nits are found on or near the scalp, most often at the neckline and behind the ears.

Treatment for head lice is recommended for persons diagnosed with an active infestation. All household members and other close contacts should be checked; those persons with evidence of an active infestation should be treated. Some experts believe prophylactic treatment is prudent for persons who share the same bed with actively-infested individuals. All infested persons (household members and close contacts) and their bedmates should be treated at the same time.

Some pediculicides (medicines that kill lice) have an ovicidal effect (kill eggs). For pediculicides that are only weakly ovicidal or not ovicidal, routine re-treatment is recommended. For those that are more strongly ovicidal, re-treatment is recommended only if live (crawling) lice are still present several days after treatment (see recommendation for each medication). To be most effective, re-treatment should occur after all eggs have hatched but before new eggs are produced.

When treating head lice, supplemental measures can be combined with recommended medicine (pharmacologic treatment); however, such additional (non-pharmacologic) measures generally are not required to eliminate a head lice infestation. For example, hats, scarves, pillow cases, bedding, clothing, and towels worn or used by the infested person in the 2-day period just before treatment is started can be machine washed and dried using the hot water and hot air cycles because lice and eggs are killed by exposure for 5 minutes to temperatures greater than 53.5°C (128.3°F). Items that cannot be laundered may be dry-cleaned or sealed in a plastic bag for two weeks. Items such as hats, grooming aids, and towels that come in contact with the hair of an infested person should not be shared. Vacuuming furniture and floors can remove an infested person's hairs that might have viable nits attached.

We here at Solomon School follow a NO-NIT POLICY. If your child has been sent home with a case of head lice and/or visible nits, they will need to be completely lice and nit free to return to class. I am here in the mornings at 7:45 available to re-check students who were sent home with an infestation. The No Nit Policy encourages each family to do its part at home with routine screening, early detection, accurate identification and thorough removal of lice and nits.

If you have any questions in regards to head lice please contact the School Nurse.

Have a great week!

HOW TO HELP PREVENT THE FLU
What should I do to protect myself from flu this season?

CDC recommends a yearly flu vaccine for everyone 6 months of age and older as the first and most important step in protecting against this serious disease.

In addition to getting a seasonal flu vaccine, you can take everyday preventive actions like staying away from sick people and washing your hands to reduce the spread of germs. If you are sick with flu, stay home from work or school to prevent spreading flu to others

What should I do to protect my loved ones from flu this season?

Encourage your loved ones to get vaccinated. Vaccination is especially important for people at high risk for developing flu complications(http://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/high_risk.htm), and their close contacts. Also, if you have a loved one who is at high risk of flu complications and they develop flu symptoms, encourage them to get a medical evaluation for possible treatment with flu antiviral drugs. These drugs work best if given within 48 hours of when symptoms start. CDC recommends that people who are at high risk for serious flu complications and who get flu symptoms during flu season be treated with flu antiviral drugs as quickly as possible. People who are not at high risk for serious flu complications may also be treated with flu antiviral drugs, especially if treatment can begin within 48 hours.

Do some children require two doses of flu vaccine?

Yes. Some children 6 months through 8 years of age will require two doses of flu vaccine for adequate protection from flu. Children in this age group who are getting vaccinated for the first time will need two doses of flu vaccine, spaced at least 28 days apart. Children who have only received one dose in their lifetime also need two doses. Your child’s doctor or other health care professional can tell you if your child needs two doses of flu vaccine.

HEARING SCREEN TO BE CONDUCTED
Hearing Screening Information Letter
Solomon School

Parents & Guardians:

In accordance with Arizona Law, all students entering in Preschool, kindergarten -2nd grade, 6th graders, students in Special Education and any student without a history of a hearing screen will receive screening here at Solomon School. We will be conducting the screening September 27-28th and the week of Oct 8th.

Why is it important to have your child’s hearing screened?

•Hearing is important for speech, language development, reading and learning
•A hearing screening can detect if your child needs further hearing testing.
•Even if your child has passed a hearing screening previously, their hearing can change.
•Hearing problems can be related to medical problems.
•Hearing loss is invisible and child may appear to be not paying attention.

Hearing screening will consist with the following test:
oAudiometry - Screening of hearing acuity.

SCREENING IS NOT REQUIRED IF:
-The child is over 16 years of age
-Child’s parent/guardian objects IN WRITING to the screening as allowed in state rules and regulations
-There is written Diagnosis or evaluation from an audiologist stating that the child is deaf or hard of hearing
-Child has a hearing aid. Assisted listening device, or a cochlear implant

If you do not wish to have your child screened, please send a signed written statement to the effect that you do not wish to have your child screened, and return prior to Sept 28th. Any refusal in screening needs to be documented in the child’s chart as screening is State Law otherwise.

If the child passes screening it will be documented in their permanent school record. If the child does not pass the hearing screen there will be a re-screening 30-45 days after the initial screening. If the second test is failed this will result in parent/guardian notification and referral for further evaluation. At the close of each year all students screened, and results are reported to AZDHS- Arizona Department of Health Services.

Please direct any questions to the school’s Nurse at 928-428-0477
Thanks for your cooperation in ensuring that we are allowing our students to have the best learning experience.

Shannon Norton
Solomon School

Parent/Guardian Engagement in School
As a parent/Guardian, you want your child to do well in school. You also want your child to be healthy and avoid behaviors that are risky or harmful. Through your guidance and support, you can have great influence on your child’s health and learning. One way you can show your support is by being involved in your child’s school. Research shows that when parents/guardians and school staff work together, students are healthier and more successful in school.

What is parent/guardian engagement in schools? Parent/guardian engagement in schools is defined as parent/guardian and school staff working together to support and improve the learning, development, and health of children and adolescents.

Why is it important for you to engage in your child’s school? Studies have shown that students who have parents or guardians engaged in their school lives are more likely to have • Higher grades and test scores. • Better student behavior. • Enhanced social skills
In addition, students who have engagement in their school lives are less likely to • Smoke cigarettes. • Drink alcohol. • Become pregnant. • Be physically inactive.

What can you do to be more engaged in your child’s school health activities? Here are some actions that you can take, at home and at school, to be more involved in your child’s school health activities.

-Advocate for your school to support parent engagement
-Take advantage of the support schools provide to parents
-Communicate consistently with the school and read the information it provides to you.
-Take time to volunteer at your child’s school
-Support learning about health in your home
-Be involved in the health decisions at the school
-Know what community services are supported by the school

Thanks for your support as we work together to give our students an amazing school year.

We hope you have a great week!

Fall Brings Cooler Weather
The weather is getting cooler and our leaves are changing. Lets greet fall with ways to help keep our children and family safe. Here are some tips to ensure a healthy season.

As the mornings are getting cooler, please ensure that your children are dressed accordingly to the changing weather. Jackets in the mornings are becoming more necessary and I am seeing several kids arriving to school without jackets and are coming in and asking if we have spares they can borrow. I have a few jackets in my office, but not very many. If you are in a financial position where you are unable to provide a jacket for your child please feel free to call me at any point I would gladly be able to work with you in ensuring that your children get what they may need for the colder weather.

With the changing weather this also means that Flu season is here. The single best way to protect you against getting the flu is to get vaccinated each year. October through December is the best time to get vaccinated. Free or low¬-cost vaccinations may be available through your doctor, nurse, job, health department, clinic, grocery store, or nursing home. Practice good health habits. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Wash your hands often with soap and water. Alcohol¬ based cleaners are also effective. Stay home if you get sick.

I would also like to wish everyone a Happy Halloween! We hope to see you at the Halloween Carnival from 5:30-7:00 on October 31st!

Bullying- What Signs to Look For
Solomon School takes the issues of bullying and harassment very seriously. Recent research suggests that young people who are bullied, may not always tell adults, as they may be afraid or ashamed. This may result in a student being victimized for a prolonged period of time before it is discovered and carries the potential for serious short, medium and long-term side effects.

In order for the school to carry out its duty of providing all students with a safe environment in which to learn, grow and develop – the school seeks to enlist the support and co-operation of all parents in the school community.

The purpose of this letter is to share with parents some of the signs that they need to be alert to. Young people who are being bullied may display one or (usually) several of the following signs:

• Comes home from school with torn or disordered clothing, with damaged books.
• Has bruises, injuries, cuts, and scratches that cannot be given a natural explanation.
• Doesn’t want to go to school and finds excuses to stay at home (for example, feeling sick).
• Wants to go to school a different way to avoid the children who are bullying them.
• Seems very tense, tearful and unhappy after school.
• Talks about hating school or not having any friends.
• Refuses to tell you what happens at school.
• Doesn’t bring classmates or other peers home after school and seldom spends time in the homes of others.
• May not have a single good friend to share free time with (play, shopping, sports and musical events, chatting on the phone, etc.).
• Is seldom or never invited for parties and may not be interested in arranging parties themselves (because they expect nobody wants to come).
• Appears afraid or reluctant to go to school in the morning, has poor appetite, repeated headaches, or stomach pains (particularly in the morning).
• Chooses an "illogical" route for going to and from school.
• Has restless sleep with bad dreams, may cry in their sleep.
• Has lost interest in school work and gets lower grades.
• Appears unhappy, sad, depressed, or show unexpected mood shifts with irritability and sudden outbursts of temper.
• Requests or takes extra money from family (to accommodate the bullies)

These signs may not necessarily mean your child is being bullied, but if present, it is necessary to check out what is worrying your child. If you have any questions or concerns in regards to this please feel free to direct any questions to our school faculty and we will ensure to take immediate action. We are dedicated to the success of our students, and to be support to the families of our students.

Regards,

Shannon Dominguez

WINTER COATS/JACKETS
Our Wonderful Friends at the Gila Valley Ministerial Association has surprised us with donations. They have provided our Nurse's office with supplies much needed for children who may have bathroom accidents at school, or need a spare change of cloths. The have been kind enough to provide multiple under-garments as well as T-shirts and socks.

I also want to inform our parents/guardians that we do carry extra winter sweaters and jackets in the office in case a student forgets to bring theirs.

If you have any question or have lightly used clothing that you would like to donate, please feel free to contact me at any point.

Thanks,
Shannon Dominguez

Just A Reminder On How To Help Prevent The Flu
Get a seasonal flu vaccine for yourself and your child to protect against seasonal flu viruses.

TAKE EVERYDAY STEPS TO PREVENT THE SPREAD OF ALL FLU VIRUSES. THIS INCLUDES:

* Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after use it.
* Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. If soap water are not available, alcohol-based hand cleaners are also effective.
* Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way.
Teach your child to take these actions too.
*Keep surfaces like bedside tables, surface in the bathroom, kitchen counters and toys for children clean by wiping them down with a household disinfectant according to directions on the product label.

Click here to open a new window and be redirected to the link mentioned above.

Thanks,
Shannon Dominguez

GIVE YOUR HOME ITS COLD AND FLU SHOT.
CLOROX DISINFECTING PRODUCTS KILL 99.9% OF THE GERMS THAT CAUSE THE FLU

Click here to open a new window and be redirected to the link mentioned above.

DISPENSING OF MEDICATION IN A SCHOOL SETTING
In order for the school nurse to give your child medication (prescription or over the counter)during school hours,all of the following requirements must be met:

Medication must be in its original pharmacy container with the following information:

1. Student's Name
2. Name of Medication
3. Prescribing Doctor
4. Dose and time to be given

.A signed note from the prescribing physician containing all the information above.

.A signed form from the parent giving the school nurse permission to dispense the medication.

This form is available in the nurse's office.

Do not send any medication-OTC or RX-to school in a PLASTIC BAG,EVELOPE or any other unmarked containers and expect it to be adminstered by school nurse.IT WILL NOT BE GIVEN! It will be destroyed.

ALL MEDICATION MUST BE HAND DELIVERED TO THE SCHOOL NURSE BY A PARENT OR RESPONSIBLE ADULT. STUDENT SHOULD NOT CARRY MEDICATIONS TO AND FROM SCHOOL.

FREE VACCINES OFFERED
VACCINES NEEDED FOR SCHOOL


Ages 4 to 6
DTAP- Diphtheria,Tetanus,Pertussis
Polio- Combined Dtap/Polio offered
MMR- Measles,Mumps,Rubella

AGE 11 TO 18

TDAP- Tetanus,Diphtheria,Tetanus,Pertussis (whooping cough)
MENACTRA- Prevents 4 kinds of bacterial meningitis
Varicella- Unless have had the chickenpox or had 2 shots


The Graham County Health Department will be offering these (and other) vaccines FREE of charge every Thursday morning (by appointment) from 8:30 to 11:00am, except for the second Wednesday of the month when clinic is from 1:30 to 4:00pm

ALL CLINICES ARE AT THE GRAHAM COUNTY HEALTH DEPARMENT 826 W. MAIN IN SAFFORD BEHIND THE COURT HOUSE

CALL 928 428-0110 FOR AN APPOINTMENT





Mosquito and west nile virus-fight the bite
Mosquito Facts

Mosquitoes are small flying insects that feed on human and animals blood or plant juices.Mosquitoes are generally considered a nuisance pest,but occasionally can transmit disease.Some mosquitoes are most active between dusk and dawn when the air is calm.Although the chances of a person becoming ill are small,there are some simple steps you can take.


1.Eliminate mosquito breeding sites on and around your property-including items such as old tires,buckest's,clogged rain gutters,cans and other containers,and anything eles that can hold a small amount of water.

2.Apply repellent to exposed skin when outdoors.

3. Wear long sleeve shirts,long pants,and socks while outdoors.

If your child participation in late afternoon sports actvates,soccer or football please protect them with mosquito repellent.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON WEST NILE VIRUS,CONTACT THE STATE HOTLINE AT 1-800-314-9243 OR WWW.WESTNILEAZ.COM

POINTERS FOR PARENTS "HOME REMEDIES"
On laundry day,help make germs go away!!

Studies show that clothes with viruses on them can contaminate others clothes in wash and viruses may even remain in the washer afterwards.To reduce the germs spread throughout the household,run empty load with 3/4 cup clorox regular-bleach in your washing machine.

MOSQUITOES
Due to the increase of mosquitoes in our area, children are receiving numerous bites on the playground. If possible please spray your child with mosquito spray before coming to school. This will help cut down the itching ans possibility of infection. I will carry spray in my office for continued control throughout the day. I also have anti-itch cream in the event that a child's bite become itchy and irritated. Thanks Again,
Medication Pick Up
The last day of the school year is nearing. The students will have early release on May 23rd. Students who have medication here will need to have it picked up no later than 1:00pm on May 24th. I will be in the office on the 24th closing up student files. Any medication that is not claimed will be destroyed after 1:00pm on the 24th.

We will not store medication in the office to be picked up at a later time. We will also not be sending medication home with students. Medication that was checked IN by a parent, will need to be checked OUT by a parent or Guardian.

If you have any questions in regarfs to this please feel free to call our Office at 928-428-0477.

Thanks Again

You Can Help Reduce The Spread Of Strep Throat And Viruses
Teach your children to wash their hands often with soap and water.

Keep sick children home for at least 24 hours after they are no longer have a fever without using fever reducing drugs.

If your child is taking an antibiotic,they must be on it for 24 hours before returning to school.

do not send your child to school if they are sick.


Anxiety and Stress in School-aged Children

Did you know that Anxiety disorders are among the most common mental, emotional and behavioral problems to occur during childhood and adolescence. About 13 of every 100 children and adolescents ages 9 to 17 experience some kind of anxiety disorder; girls are affected more than boys. About half of children and adolescents with anxiety disorders have a second anxiety disorder or other mental or behavioral disorder, such as depression. In addition, anxiety disorders may coexist with physical health conditions requiring treatment.

What are anxiety disorders?

Children and adolescents with anxiety disorders typically experience intense fear, worry or uneasiness that can last for long periods of time and significantly affect their lives. If not treated early, anxiety disorders can lead to:
• Repeated school absences or an inability to finish school;
• Impaired relations with peers;
• Low self-esteem;
• Alcohol or other drug use;
• Problems adjusting to work situations; and,
• Anxiety disorder in adulthood.

What are the types and signs of anxiety disorders?
Many different anxiety disorders affect children and adolescents.

Generalized Anxiety Disorder:

Separation Anxiety Disorder: Panic Disorder:

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder:

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder:

Who is at risk?
Researchers have found that the basic temperament of young people may play a role in some childhood and adolescent anxiety disorders. For example, some children tend to be very shy and restrained in unfamiliar situations; a possible sign that they are at risk for developing an anxiety disorder. Research in this area is very complex, because children's fears often change as they age.
Researchers also suggest watching for signs of anxiety disorders when children are between the ages of 6 and 8. During this time, children generally grow less afraid of the dark and imaginary creatures and become more anxious about school performance and social relationships. An excessive amount of anxiety in children this age may be a warning sign for the development of anxiety disorders later in life.

Studies suggest that children or adolescents are more likely to have an anxiety disorder if they have a parent with anxiety disorders. However, the studies do not prove whether the disorders are caused by biology, environment or both. More data are needed to clarify whether anxiety disorders can be inherited.

If you are concerned about your child having an anxiety disorder please contact you child’s pediatrician so we can ensure your child continues having a successful educational experience.

Thanks,
Shannon

Anxiety and Stress in School-aged Children

Did you know that Anxiety disorders are among the most common mental, emotional and behavioral problems to occur during childhood and adolescence. About 13 of every 100 children and adolescents ages 9 to 17 experience some kind of anxiety disorder; girls are affected more than boys. About half of children and adolescents with anxiety disorders have a second anxiety disorder or other mental or behavioral disorder, such as depression. In addition, anxiety disorders may coexist with physical health conditions requiring treatment.

What are anxiety disorders?

Children and adolescents with anxiety disorders typically experience intense fear, worry or uneasiness that can last for long periods of time and significantly affect their lives. If not treated early, anxiety disorders can lead to:
• Repeated school absences or an inability to finish school;
• Impaired relations with peers;
• Low self-esteem;
• Alcohol or other drug use;
• Problems adjusting to work situations; and,
• Anxiety disorder in adulthood.

What are the types and signs of anxiety disorders?
Many different anxiety disorders affect children and adolescents.

Generalized Anxiety Disorder:

Separation Anxiety Disorder: Panic Disorder:

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder:

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder:

Who is at risk?
Researchers have found that the basic temperament of young people may play a role in some childhood and adolescent anxiety disorders. For example, some children tend to be very shy and restrained in unfamiliar situations; a possible sign that they are at risk for developing an anxiety disorder. Research in this area is very complex, because children's fears often change as they age.
Researchers also suggest watching for signs of anxiety disorders when children are between the ages of 6 and 8. During this time, children generally grow less afraid of the dark and imaginary creatures and become more anxious about school performance and social relationships. An excessive amount of anxiety in children this age may be a warning sign for the development of anxiety disorders later in life.

Studies suggest that children or adolescents are more likely to have an anxiety disorder if they have a parent with anxiety disorders. However, the studies do not prove whether the disorders are caused by biology, environment or both. More data are needed to clarify whether anxiety disorders can be inherited.

If you are concerned about your child having an anxiety disorder please contact you child’s pediatrician so we can ensure your child continues having a successful educational experience.

Thanks,
Shannon

Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye)
There have been recent reports of pink eye making its rounds around the local schools. Conjunctivitis is highly communicable and can be spread quite easily from one person to another. I am providing this information to inform you of the best practices for prevention and/ or recurrence of this common infection.

What is Conjunctivitis?
Conjunctivitis (also known as “Pink Eye”) is an inflammation or infection of the transparent membrane (conjunctiva) that lines your eyelid and part of your eyeball.

Causes of Conjunctivitis:
Viruses and Bacteria may cause conjunctivitis. It may affect one or both eyes.

Symptoms:
• Redness in one or both eyes
• Itchiness in one or both eyes
• A gritty feeling in one or both eyes
• A discharge in one or both eyes that forms a crust during the night
• Tearing

Prevention:
Preventing the spread of pink eye
Pink eye spreads very easily from one person to another. It is important to practice good hygiene to control the spread of pink eye. For example:
• Don’t touch your eyes with your hands
• Wash your hands often
• Use a clean towel and washcloth daily
• Don’t share towels or washcloths
• Change your pillowcase often
• Throw away your eye cosmetics, such as mascara
• Don’t share eye cosmetics or personal eye-care items

Parents/Guardians we advised that children should not attend school during the communicable phase of this illness. This is when there is active drainage and secretion from the eyes. Should you have further questions in regard to Conjunctivitis, please contact the me at 928-428-0477.

Thanks,
Shannon Dominguez

Medication Pick Up
The last day of the school year is nearing. The students will have early release on May 23rd. Students who have medication here will need to have it picked up no later than 1:00pm on May 24th. I will be in the office on the 24th closing up student files. Any medication that is not claimed will be destroyed after 1:00pm on the 24th.

We will not store medication in the office to be picked up at a later time. We will also not be sending medication home with students. Medication that was checked IN by a parent, will need to be checked OUT by a parent or Guardian.

If you have any questions in regarfs to this please feel free to call our Office at 928-428-0477.

Thanks Again

MANAGING ALLERGIES AT SCHOOL
Does your child miss school due to allergies? If so, you're not alone.

On any given day, about 10,000 of those children miss school because of their allergies. That's a total of more than 2 million lost school days every year. Even if your child doesn't miss school, allergies can get in the way of a productive school day, so managing allergies at school is an important part of caring for your child's health.

Managing Allergy Symptoms at School

Symptoms like fatigue, headache, sneezing, runny noses, watery eyes, and itchiness can get in the way of attention and concentration, and the medications taken to manage these symptoms can also interfere with school performance. What's a parent to do?
At home, you can do a lot more to control your child's environment and limit exposure to allergens than you can at school. But it's worthwhile to ask your child's teacher or school health aide how they handle allergies at school.

Treating Allergies at School With Prescription Nasal Sprays

If your child has moderate to severe allergies, simple environmental control measures and over-the-counter medications probably will not control their symptoms well enough. For these children, the best method of controlling many allergy symptoms is prescription nasal steroids, according to Pediatricians who specialize in childhood allergies.
You only need to use a prescription nasal spray once a day, and they work best at controlling [nasal] allergy symptoms. They're the preferred first-line treatment.

Turning to Antihistamines for Allergies at School

If you can't get your child to use a nasal spray, or if the sprays aren't completely controlling your child's allergy symptoms at school, then antihistamines are your next step. Antihistamines help reduce the symptoms of itching, sneezing, and runny nose.
Many parents worry that prescription antihistamines will leave their children groggy and unable to concentrate. Although antihistamines can have a slight sedating effect, untreated allergies will make your child even drowsier and distracted.

Talk to your child's doctor to get a prescription for one of the antihistamines approved for young school-age children. There are quite a few available, including Allegra, Claritin, Xyzal, and Zyrtec.

If you have any questions about medication that we keep in the Nurses’ office for allergies please feel free to contact me at anytime. Here at Solomon I am able to administer different over-the-counter or prescribed allergy medications as needed, to a student as long as the medication administration authorization paperwork has been completed, signed and given to the Nurse or School Office.

HAVE A GREAT WEEK!!!!!

10 Steps To Have A Healthy School Year Ever!
1. Start off strong with a healthy breakfast. A good breakfast provides energy and will help keep you alert and attentive in class. Highly sugared foods leave you feeling tired soon after eating.
Remember: Your school performance is directly related to what you eat!

2. Drink plenty of water. Water is the best fluid to stay hydrated without the added sugar found in some juice and soft drinks. Also, remember to drink the recommended amount of reduced-fat milk or milk alternative. Water and milk are available at school for breakfast and lunch every day.

3. Don’t forget to wash your hands often. Keep hands away from your face, mouth, and nose where germs can enter your body.

4. Boost your immune system. Get plenty of sleep, talk to your doctor about taking a multiple vitamin, and eat colorful fruits and vegetables every day. Think variety and rainbow colors!

5. Eat a nutritious and yummy lunch. Eat foods from all the food groups. Different food groups supply our bodies with energy to think, move, and grow. Our School lunches are nutritionally balanced, but on the weekends keep this in mind.

6. Cut back on sugar and salty snacks. Limit sodas, sport drinks, candy, chips, and ice cream – they add on extra calories, can harm your teeth, and leave you feeling tired and weak.

7. Enhance your brain performance. Exercise, play memory games, do crossword puzzles, and eat brain foods like berries, cold water fish, and nuts. Just say “NO” to fast food and enjoy a home cooked meal together at least four nights a week.

8. Get at least 30 minutes of exercise every day – at recess and at home. Go for a daily walk with a friend, a parent , or your pet. Exercise helps our bodies to be strong, flexible, and resilient.

9. Do your homework every day after school. It’s so important to be prepared!

10. Turn off the TV and video games at least one hour prior to bedtime. Take time to relax, take a - bath or shower, brush your teeth, and pack up for the morning – and still get good sleep!

Identifying Symptoms that need to be addressed at home
Children who have the following symptoms should not come to school until these symptoms have been gone for 24 hours without the help of medication, or until the doctor sends a note stating the condition is not contagious and it is OK for your child to return to school.

Fever
If your child's temperature is 100 degrees or higher, keep your child at home. While at home, encourage your child to drink plenty of liquids. Your child should be fever-free for 24 hours (without medicine such as Tylenol or Motrin) before returning to school.

Mild Cough/Runny Nose
If there's no fever, and the child feels fairly good, school is fine.

Bad Cough/Cold Symptoms
Children with bad coughs need to stay home, and possibly see a doctor. It could be a severe cold or possibly bronchitis, flu, or pneumonia. But when the cough improves, and the child is feeling better, then it's back to school. Don't wait for the cough to disappear entirely -- that could take a week or longer!

Diarrhea or Vomiting
Keep your child home until the illness is over, and for 24 hours after the last episode without medicine.

Pink Eye (Conjunctivitis)
Keep the child home until a doctor has given the OK to return to school. Pink eye is highly contagious and most cases are caused by a virus, which will not respond to an antibiotic. Bacterial conjunctivitis will require an antibiotic; your doctor will be able to determine if this is the case. If antibiotics are prescribed, they must have at least 24 hours of the medicine or drops before returning to school.

Rash
Children with a skin rash should see a doctor, as this could be one of several infectious diseases. One possibility is impetigo, a bacterial skin infection that is very contagious and requires antibiotic treatment. If the rash has any drainage coming from it, the child must be seen by a doctor and may return with a doctor’s note clearing them for school.

It is great that students want to come to school, but it is very important to stop the spread of germs throughout the school.

HAVE STUDENTS STAY HOME WHEN YOU ARE TOO SICK TO COME TO SCHOOL. DO NOT SEND CHILDREN IN TO BE EVALUATED BY THE NURSE. THIS CAUSES GERMS TO SPREAD TO CLASSMATES AND BUS PARTNERS. TAKE THEM TO THE DOCTOR IF SYMPTOMS PERSIST.

Regards,
Shannon Norton

Immunization Rules for School Entry/ Attendance Has Been Revised
To protect all children against serious vaccine preventable diseases, Arizona school immunization laws require students to receive immunizations before entry to child care and school. The law requires child care facilities and schools to enforce immunization requirements, maintain immunization records of all children enrolled, and submit reports to public health agencies. This letter is to inform you of recently approved rule changes to the Arizona Administrative Code (A.A.C.) Title 9, Chapter 6, Article 7, Required Immunizations for Child Care or School Entry. These changes became effective as of August 31, 2018.
The new requirements are listed below.
Child Care – Age 5 Requirements are as follows:
3 Hepatitis B
4 DTap (Diphtheria, Tetanus & Pertussis)
3 Polio
1 MMR (Measles, Mumps, & Rubella)
1 Varicella
3-4 Hib (Heamophilus Influenza type B- Before 15months of age) OR
1 Hib after 15 months of age
2 Doses of Hepatitis A are required for children 1-5 years in MARICOPA COUNTY ONLY, but are recommended in all other counties.

Grades K-12 Requirements are as follows:
3 Hepatitis B
4 Polio
2 MMR (Measles, Mumps, & Rubella)
1 Varicella
5 DTap (4 doses is acceptable if the last dose was given on or after 4th birthday)
1 Tdap (at 11 yr old, prior to 6th grade entry)
1 Meningococcal ( between 10-11 yrs old, prior to 6th grade entry)
1 Hib (after 15 months of age)

HEAD LICE
A case of head lice has been detected in our school. Head lice infestation is very common, and it has been around since ancient times. While the exact frequency of infections is unknown, estimates range from 6-12 million cases annually. Anyone who comes in close contact with someone who already has head lice, or even their contaminated clothing and other belongings, is at risk for acquiring head lice. So it is easy to transmit head lice from one person to another. Preschool and elementary-school children (3-11 years of age) and their families are infected most often. Girls contract head lice more often than boys, and women contract more head lice than men.

What are Head Lice?

Head lice are parasitic wingless insects. They live on people's heads and feed on their blood. An adult louse is about the size of a sesame seed. The eggs, called nits, are even smaller - about the size of a knot in thread. Lice and nits are found on or near the scalp, most often at the neckline and behind the ears.

Treatment for head lice is recommended for persons diagnosed with an active infestation. All household members and other close contacts should be checked; those persons with evidence of an active infestation should be treated. Some experts believe prophylactic treatment is prudent for persons who share the same bed with actively-infested individuals. All infested persons (household members and close contacts) and their bedmates should be treated at the same time.

Some pediculicides (medicines that kill lice) have an ovicidal effect (kill eggs). For pediculicides that are only weakly ovicidal or not ovicidal, routine re-treatment is recommended. For those that are more strongly ovicidal, re-treatment is recommended only if live (crawling) lice are still present several days after treatment (see recommendation for each medication). To be most effective, re-treatment should occur after all eggs have hatched but before new eggs are produced.

When treating head lice, supplemental measures can be combined with recommended medicine (pharmacologic treatment); however, such additional (non-pharmacologic) measures generally are not required to eliminate a head lice infestation. For example, hats, scarves, pillow cases, bedding, clothing, and towels worn or used by the infested person in the 2-day period just before treatment is started can be machine washed and dried using the hot water and hot air cycles because lice and eggs are killed by exposure for 5 minutes to temperatures greater than 53.5°C (128.3°F). Items that cannot be laundered may be dry-cleaned or sealed in a plastic bag for two weeks. Items such as hats, grooming aids, and towels that come in contact with the hair of an infested person should not be shared. Vacuuming furniture and floors can remove an infested person's hairs that might have viable nits attached.

We here at Solomon School follow a NO-NIT POLICY. If your child has been sent home with a case of head lice and/or visible nits, they will need to be completely lice and nit free to return to class. I am here in the mornings at 7:45 available to re-check students who were sent home with an infestation. The No Nit Policy encourages each family to do its part at home with routine screening, early detection, accurate identification and thorough removal of lice and nits.

If you have any questions in regards to head lice please contact the School Nurse.

Have a great week!

Solomon School, Copyright 2019

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